2000 Toyota Tundra white smoke

NickD

wrench
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
5,054
Points
48
Seems to be a very common problem with this vehicle. Here is one response from the net that makes sense, as usual, hundreds of others are guessing.

"My 2000 did this and there were several other posts way back about it. I called the Toyota rep and he said nothing to worry bout. Mine had the wrong dipstick so it was overfilled for awhile, but I think some else mentioned that the circumstances of humidity ,temp and emmissions systems puts to much oil in intake manifold and on short trips it does not get a chance to burn out & upon start up it puffs a little.. Mine did it for awhile when new and now will not do it at all. Guess I drive it a little harder now.."

https://www.tundrasolutions.com/threads/puff-of-blue-smoke-on-startup.7437/
 

NickD

wrench
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
5,054
Points
48
Point of this is how much engine oil is being consumed, if very little, no concern, on a 94 Bravada, consumed a quart every 600 mile, GM just put in a tiny O ring on top of the valve clips that rotted away. Cure was to add umbrella valve caps like was used on a 41 Chevy.

Afterwards, was a quart every 6,000 miles, and talk about a bad carboned up engine, compression was only 80-90 psi, but after several cans of Seafoam, back up to 150 psi.
 

tdark

Hero Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
341
Points
18
I talked him today. He said he is now driving the truck since I told him it was not coolant smoke. He said the sometimes it is worse than other times. I told him to just drive it. Its a 20 year old truck that probably needs valve seals or something similar. I will report back when I hear more.. THANKS. Tom
 

NickD

wrench
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
5,054
Points
48
Can of Seafoam sure helps. Looked at the intake valves on an engine, bottoms of the valve were covered with thick carbon build up. Couple of cans of Seafoam cleaned all that off and in particular the piston rings.

We started using Seafoam in our small engines, one ounce per gallon of gas. Going on ten years now with a snowthrower and lawn mower without even replacing or cleaning the spark plug and start with the first pull.

Also using full synthetic oil and ethanol free gas. Dyno oil puts a coat of varnish on everything including your piston cylinders and rings.
 

NickD

wrench
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
5,054
Points
48
What's so positive about a positive crankcase ventilation system, Was okay with old carb vehicles, junk blow by from the pistons was sucked under the carb into the intake manifold.

But using electronic control for fuel air mixture with variable fuel injectors changed all this, not exactly air by required by the brilliant EPA to return the PCV junk into the air cleaner along with the rest of atmospheric air. As the vehicle ages, get even more blow by that deposites on the face of the injectors affecting the spray pattern, even restricting the flow in some cases or getting caugth into the pintel of the injector preventing it from closing. This extra fuel when starting will certainly end up in exhaust pipe smoke, also hazardous to the health of your catalytic converter.

Simple test is to hook up a fuel pressure tester and learning what your fuel pressure is, typical is 35, 45, 55 psi, after 13 hours of down time this is what you should read even after a 24 hours period. Most common problem for low pressure readings is a leaking injector. But with mandatory fuel evaporate systems can have leaks anywhere, instead of one fuel line, have three, super long gas filler tube, gas cap gasket, you name it, we have problems.

Leaking injector will have more carbon build up on the spark plug.

Cure may be as simple as Seafoam, can be added to gas, to engine oil, and even poured directly into the trottle body, but not fun on horiztonal ones. Also have problems with throttle by wire, use an underpowered servo motor, that needs a weak return spring, where the valve sticks open due to carbon buildup.

Really returning the PCV to the air intake is not a good idea, even worse in a turbin vehicle, carbon build up on the blades. Dyno oil is another bad thing, leaves varnish over everything, synthelic is far superior.


Another solution the auto manufacturers would like you to do, is when your warranty runs out trade it in for a new one. But this is when you learn your baby is worth next to nothing.
 

tdark

Hero Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
341
Points
18
I talked to him yesterday and again he has it parked. He tells me it is oil smoke like I had mentioned to him last month. Said it was sort of embarrassing to start it up with anyone around for all the smoke. This happened all of sudden. I thought maybe valve seals but they normally dond't start all of sudden. Still looking for what might have happened to this engine.
 

billr

wrench
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Messages
6,791
Points
48
What about the hunt for a leak from the PS vacuum system (whatever that is...)?
 
Top