Paint and primer,

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#1
Ok I'm needing some advice on priming my 79 camaro .. I'm going to use contour polyester primer on the body to get nice straight edges .. But I got to thinking I probably shouldn't use this primer on hard to sand area's since it is a high build primer ... So my question is should I use just a straight spray primer for hard to sand area's ..
 
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#2
I see no one answering, so I will put my 60 year old out dated opinion out there.

I really do not know, but I think you are over thinking this. In other words, I don't think it matters.

I doubt you will even notice the difference.

Saying primers are different is like saying oils are different. Of course they are, but does it really matter in the long run????.
 
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#3
I see no one answering, so I will put my 60 year old out dated opinion out there.

I really do not know, but I think you are over thinking this. In other words, I don't think it matters.

I doubt you will even notice the difference.

Saying primers are different is like saying oils are different. Of course they are, but does it really matter in the long run????.
Thank you for the reply ... Yes I see what your saying ... I'm just concerned that if I spray a high build primer in to spaces that can't be sanded .. Wouldn't that look terrible.. I've never used this primer.. This will be my first time painting a car .. I'm not sure rather a fine coat over these none sandable area's will be ok ... Or like I was saying maybe using a spray primer out of a can to do those tight area's..
 

billr

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#5
Like Jack, I don't really know, but would suggest trying the "high-build" stuff on a sample piece. You could even make some "hard to sand" creases or pockets using some thin aluminum or steel sheet-metal flashing material from Lowe's or HD. What thickness is "high-build", like .015" as opposed to something like .003"-.005"?
 
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#6
Like Jack, I don't really know, but would suggest trying the "high-build" stuff on a sample piece. You could even make some "hard to sand" creases or pockets using some thin alugunminum or steel sheet-metal flashing material from Lowe's or HD. What thickness is "high-build", like .015" as opposed to something like .003"-.005"?
The picture that I uploaded is a example of what I mean by hard to sand area's.. This is the trunk hinge on a 79 camaro just like mine and as you can see once you spray A high build primer I don't see how I would be able to sand any of it ...I could be TOTALLY OVER THINKING THIS .... But the amount of money that I'm spending on paint , body panels , and prep work I just want to do it right and make sure I know for sure when i start spraying primer that everything will be fine .. I'm very mechanically inclined and have been working on vehicles since I was knee high to a grass hopper .. But paint, and prep work is a little different story lol ... Again thanks guys for any and all comments a every bit will help
 

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billr

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#7
I think the thicker primer will look better on parts like that, but doing a sample is still always a safe bet.